Name

chkservice — display the status of service bundles

Synopsis

chkservice [--user] [--cursor-keypad-application-mode] [--calculator-keypad-application-mode] [--no-alternate-screen-buffer] [names...]

Description

chkservice displays a full-screen TUI that lists the statuses of service bundles.

It operates in one of two modes, controlled by the {--user} command line option:

  • In "system" mode it operates on system-wide state and services. It potentially communicates with a Service Manager process, such as service-manager(1) via a local domain socket at /run/service-manager/control and via the control/status API of the individual services.

  • In "user" mode it operates on per-user state and services. It potentially communicates with a Service Manager process, such as service-manager(1) via a local domain socket at /run/user/$USER/service-manager/control and via the control/status API of the individual services.

The --cursor-keypad-application-mode and --calculator-keypad-application-mode command-line options instruct chkservice to switch, respectively, the cursor keypad and the calculator keypad of the realizing terminal into their "application" modes. Otherwise it switches them into their "normal" modes. "application" mode is generally not useful to chkservice, since it makes cursor and calculator keys indistinguishable from accelerator keys. The --no-alternate-screen-buffer command-line option instructs chkservice to not switch to the alternative screen buffer. This has two uses. First, it allows one to retain visibility of displayed information after the program has exited (although setterm(1) provides access to the alternative screen buffer). Second, it works around problems with some (yet more!) broken terminal emulators that attempt to be and fail at being like XTerm, which forcibly change cursor and editing keys into application mode when the alternative screen buffer is active.

Example

chkservice /run/service-bundles/*/* /etc/service-bundles/*/* /var/local/sv/* /var/service-bundles/*/*

Show all of the system services in some conventional places.

Author

Jonathan de Boyne Pollard